Tad

He was very young and it had recurred in his brain. Tad was playing on his computer when I walked into the room. He looked healthy, his eyes bright and beaming with intelligence. I sat across from him in the old cancer center and he asked me question after question. I connected with him instantly and we talked. He always came alone, never accompanied by anyone. I respected his independence. He looked things up on the internet brought them to my attention. My melanoma program was young then and new therapies were still not available. It was hard to tell him about death, to share with him the lack of treatments available and to tell about how clinical trials work. He took it all in and shared with me that he would like to try something. He participated in a trial only offered here in Iowa. He became an instant hero. I shared with him the limitations of research, the problems we faced and how science alone is the best way to fight cancers that have no good treatments.  We discussed many thoughts and theories and he engaged with me as he went through his treatments. His tumors grew despite the treatment in his brain. I look back at the day I told him the news and he was wheeled off to surgery to have the tumors removed.

It had been 2 years without a word. I knew he was out there. He had not come back to see me nor visited. I thought about him a lot and what he was up to. I heard small snippets of his life. Tad did not want to get any more treatment and was living it up. I missed him and thought about his bravery and how his disease was just an obstacle that had crippled his life. I formed my own convictions about what and how he was living. Suddenly out of nowhere he came to see me. He was not the same, he lay there. He was crippled with his disease, his speech slurred, and he had a hard time articulating his words. I walked into the room, dazed that this man had made the journey after such a long time of silence to say goodbye. I sat down next to him, held his hand and began to cry. It is a rare moment for me to cry with my patients. He wanted me to know that he was content with everything, that he was comfortable and had lived his life fully. I was stunned at his outgoing attitude despite all the difficulties this disease had placed in front of him. He told me its ok, and he just wanted to say goodbye. I cannot find the words to express to you how that made me feel and I write this blog with words that cannot describe my sentiment around him that day.

Tad’s impact went further than anything I could imagine. One month after he passed, friends of his gathered at a bar and collected donations to help my growing program. His parents whom I had met on his last visit came to see me to share with me the event that took place. I am humbled by the efforts of all those who have helped create snowballs that become avalanches that remove uncertainty from the knowledge of this cancer. Helping us find ways to wipe it out. Tad resonates deeply in my heart and he showed me that “Every man dies, but not every man lives” his most famous quote from William Wallace. Tad died, but he lives in the Iowa Melanoma program, moving the science forward in ways I hope he would be proud of. Each year dedicated friends and family gather round and make sure that Tad’s legacy remains that he was a man who decided to live his life despite all the odds.

Tad, I bow deep and honor your courage. You are one of my true heroes. Thank you.

Mo

On Monday, March 3rd, I was a guest on the Paula Sands Live show in the Quad Cities, talking about Tips for Tad. Watch here: http://bit.ly/NUlU5P

Mo at Paula Sands Live

Mo tips for tad shirt

Tad Flyer

 

Eclipse

It is hidden, and it is beautiful. It is like a veil that conceals but it is a phenomenon worth watching. Over time we have come to understand how and what it is. Does this knowledge subtract from its beauty when we know the truth of what actually happens? I feel that it adds a dimension of appreciation that is not easy to explain.  My team and I visited a scientist lab that transported me to new dimension a place that is foreign, different and exciting.

We walked through the halls like a maze to a room. Sometimes it feels like I’m in a spaceship walking through the different passages. What I saw was new and strange. Where were the rules? Cancer has no boundaries. Ok let me stretch my mind around what I am seeing. Can I see what I am not seeing?  Cancer is constantly redefining the boundaries of those past ideas that attempt to limit it.

It was my first glimpse at a 3 dimensional live reconstruction of a tumor growing in a petri dish. We had grown accustomed to seeing cancer through a microscope after it had been sectioned and placed on a glass slide. This process was not 2 dimensional at all. I pushed the 3D glasses closer to my eyes as I tried to understand what it was I was looking at. Marveling at what I guess I knew all along but had not seen it to believe.

This makes sense, of course it behaves this way, how else could it have behaved? It moves, it is not static, it is alive, and it evolves. It is intelligent. Even the scientist trying to explain it was searching for how to explain its unique nature.  I left the lab thinking to myself that the world is now round it is no longer flat. Was I now convinced that I should change how I think about this process?

I do not know how to share the beauty of a process that is too fascinating to ignore, its power lies in that which we cannot see.  It is unfortunate because it involves us, humans, and makes us suffer. I look back at my clinic today and all those affected by cancer who have to face it with courage. It is in the hidden complexity, the eclipse that takes our breath away, when what is not seen is revealed. Just like the moon that shields the rays upon the sun allowing us brief moments to contemplate what an amazing natural process this truly is.

Mo

Closure.

“I didn’t know I could talk to you” he said to me in the clinic today. We hugged and he sat down, “It happened so fast.” We were both fighting back some tears. “She was an amazing woman” I chimed, trying to find the right footing as we talked.

It was the end of my clinic and a family came to see me to find closure in the care of their loved one. This is a side of me that is very private and my voice is sharing this with you. My heart is not.  It is a rare event that I come full circle and have a chance to talk about someone who lived.

What is important to me in the closure of a patient who passes? I’ll share this intimate detail with you now.

When patients cross my path on their extraordinary journey, I deal with their cancer, their treatment and their ailments, I talk shop, science, but I never hear about the way they lived during this time. I never hear about what they did and what they really felt. I want to know that they embraced each day and that they did not let this beat them and that they fought for what they wanted. This was true for me today. I heard how she lived………………… “She hated that pill” and “the sun was all she wanted to do and went out despite you telling her not to” (my goodness, I laughed at that) ……… and we talked more………and I had closure. YEAH! My heart yelled. She LIVED. I always thought I would make the worst patient. I would never let an illness eat away at my life, and I would live despite what the “doctors” say.

“I feel better that I came and talked to you, Mo, I had no idea how to initiate this, I did not know it was even an option” he said to me, staring right at me, through me. I explained he was and always will be my family, and is welcome anytime. I have done this with many families. I guess I want them to know how it makes a difference to me and how it helps me heal too from the loss of a friend. “Thank you for taking the time” he told me, hugged me and left. Really? I believe I have to thank him for taking the time to come to me, to sit with me. One human to the next, is this so hard? What did he have to face? Memories of her treatment, bad news, decisions made……and he came anyway. “I was very anxious coming, I did not know what to expect.”

Perhaps our medical system should have a closure visit built into the system to allow physicians a chance to heal from wounds that sometimes make us appear indifferent or callous. Wisdom has softened my heart, and death has opened my compassion.

I never thought I would be writing like this, talking like this to all of you. When I first started blogging, I thought I couldn’t be myself and that I’d have to talk science and other stuff and be the “doctor”. I am discovering I am not able to do that. I picked Tuesday evening to write because it’s a clinic day for me and I am the closest to my patients when I am in clinic. I also realized how they make me feel.

Thank you, my friends.

Mo

 

 

 

Connections.

What an interesting two days I have had. Has me thinking about the matrix of talent that I live amongst.

I was chatting yesterday with Ben Miller, our orthopedic surgeon who handles all the limb surgeries that sarcoma patients need. We talked about a sarcoma symposium and how to bring more talented researchers to understand sarcoma and melanoma biology. It is in these small discussions that I find the thrill of discovery.

I am surrounded by talent.

Our cancer center exists in an academic university environment. Like a spider’s web, we are able to connect through interactions that focus on improving the lives of the patients afflicted with this illness. Wherever I turn, I find an opportunity to connect with someone.

So how does this web come to life? What are its components?

As I learn to write to you all and share my thoughts tonight I want to paint a picture of people who facilitate all the work that comes into a decision for a patient. It extends from helping my colleagues in Missouri understand angiosarcoma biology or keeping it closer to home to understand obesity and how it affects immunity.

It’s Wendee who fights harder than me to keep my ship afloat.

It’s Tina and Laura working hard to maintain a registry.

It’s Marian fixing and regulating my clinical trials.

It’s Melanie and Reggie coordinating and facilitating the research that keeps our fires burning.

Many meet “Mo” and he is just an interface to the matrix that lives behind him. Our multidisciplinary teams that focus on the clinical aspects of caring for patients, down to Erin and Juli who help schedule all the meetings and make this a reality.

I have connected with Scott Okuno at Mayo Clinic and Mark Agulnik at Northwestern in Chicago. And now I’m talking to you. I wonder how this all started? I simply asked to get to know them and found them so receptive to collaborate. It must be the midwest.

I am blessed to be amongst such dedication and commitment. I can see no boundaries.

From Terry and Jo ‘Riding It Out for Amber’; to the Bailey’s for the courage to stand up and bike; to the Yates for yelling “fore”; to Nancy’s promise; to Alissa and her amazing determination to never give up; to Hannah for making me part of her family… no boundaries.

Hence this small introduction to my team- anyone can join us. These are some of the many faces that help me fight. Many who have gotten to know me have asked me how I do it every day, facing this.. I tell them, “I married a psychiatrist” and they laugh. Well, Arwa, my wife, knows better. It is the people that surround me that I draw my inspiration to help those in need. Understanding our connectivity to each other and the willingness of so many to put their best food forward makes me proud to be  a part of all of this.

Mo

 

Check out these websites:

Ride It Out for Amber

Courage Ride

The Steve Yates Golf Tournament

The Jim White Foundation

 

 

Melanoma, Iowa and Our Story.

Melanoma has been a disease that has fascinated me. Unpredictable, dangerous and exceptionally intelligent. Its funny to talk about a disease this way.

I have been wondering how one actually starts blogging, thought about a start but perhaps I can talk to all of you this way.

Through the science that is attached to our work and our mission. Melanoma is a disease that is increasing in Iowa and across the world. 1 in 68 people in the United States will be diagnosed with this Melanoma in 2013. How can something so small on the skin have such a powerful impact on us as human beings?

Perhaps its origin might shed light on how and why it is unpredictable ; It originates in a group of cells called the “Neural Crest” , these are found very early when we are only embryos. Neural crest cells, stem cell biology, melanomagenesis (the cancer biology of melanoma), how these cells function normally are important in helping scientists elucidate the secrets of this disease.

Over the last few years, A dedicated team in Iowa and the midwest is slowly coming together to focus its efforts on melanoma research and understanding this disease. We have partnered through the Midwest Melanoma Partnership (MMP), http://www.midwestmelanoma.org, with 15 institutions to create a robust mechanism to share ideas and collaborate on many projects.

I will be writing regularly every wednesday night telling you our story and letting you meet the amazing people who have really made an impact to help patients get the best care. We value collaboration, creative ideas, universal sharing and innovation. Let this be a platform for us to communicate and for us to understand how to do this better.

Mo