Permission

“You’re a good man”, said my patient as he hugged me. He was tapping me kindly on my back. He had waited for over an hour to see me. Wheelchair bound I was saddened when I walked in to see him. I was realizing the end was near as the quote of the series Dr. Who flashed through my mind…when The Doctor says….” I am not a good man, but I am not bad man, I am definitely not a president, or a general or an officer…….I am in idiot with a box and a screwdriver, helping out when I can, learning.” The obvious part is that I am helping out when I can, and the rest of the truth is that I am an idiot passing through with the knowledge I have acquired, and learning as I go. I discovered that my patients have been teaching me something they do very well; teaching me how to die. Here he sat in the wheelchair, he looked ready. What was he waiting for?

I have acquired an innate understanding of death. I recognize it, I accept it, and I too am scared of it. It is a stretch to talk about death like we do about life. Death is more inevitable than life itself yet we tend to dismiss it. We focus on life, and on the aspects that are important to develop a career, an education, a pathway and a life, a relationship and a way to replicate ourselves and bring in more lives to this world. But, as I talk to so many who are ready to transition to death, I tend to think of it as a suspension. That is another story for another day. This man was a little different he made a trip to see me, but I am hiding the ending behind the veil, because it is what is making my statement more powerful. He is making me talk about death to you as intimate, as something there, and maybe we should not be dismissing it. We tend to not want to embark on the journey that challenges our intellect or our comfort, or our narcissism. We do not talk about it objectively or even humorously like we do about a thrilling story in Halloween, not every day, not all the time. We do not talk about it with a bit of comradery, or some spirituality, or some vulnerability? “It” is the way we observe it. Why are we talking about Dr. Who?

He sat there. Haggard. I told him it was time to die. That he should be made “Hospice”, that his cancer was everywhere, and that there is nothing I could do. I was sure of that. My mind fighting the words, “We have had this conversation……why did you come?” He gracefully accepted and hugged me. All the people in the room did that. Why so thankful I thought? How could death today not be so familiar to me, I say goodbye to so many. The relationship being re-defined. The news came the next morning, he died early morning peacefully surrounded by his family. I make sure I always ask how. My heart goes out to his family and I was sad. He knew what he was doing. He signaled that he was dying, as if he wanted permission to give in to its call. He wanted to not let me down, not let his family down he was fighting for those around him. Once the news was out, he let go.

I am just passing through, learning from those who travel into the suspension they go.

Mo

Injured

She died on Saturday evening. A wonderful woman; elegant, sophisticated and intriguing. She had battled her cancer; therapy after therapy, always trusting the decisions being made always trying to remain ahead, never giving up or in, never wavering. Her last therapy I recalled had injured her lungs making it hard to continue. I go back to that moment, it’s not easy to know that our therapies have consequences and sometimes the outcomes are not what we want. Damages from our treatment, whether in the short term or the long term, are now playing an important role in our choices of what we treat our patients with. Why bring this up now?

As most of you have realized I have not been blogging for a long period of time. There are many reasons, which I will not divulge, but I will share one. Over time I have been sharing intimate stories with you. Each blog is truly a touching experience for me and hard sometimes to materialize into words. Yet I found myself doing that time and time again. I had not realized that sharing these stories was cathartic to some and injurious to others. Each blog represents a humans experience and journey with me. Such is surgery and chemotherapy, they are painful, often helpful, and not always curative. I found myself revisiting scars and wounds that made up the utter fabric of my existence. It was hard to put a positive spin on things, as often they have sad endings. It was hard to read them after I had written them. So I decided to pause. In this pause I have been reflecting and rethinking, “how am I supposed to write? What reason do I have to write?”

Today I received an email from a patient who had survived her disease. I am quoting it word for word….please take a moment….to read these powerful words.

“Hi Dr. Mo,

I felt the need to write and thank you. After my last visit this past summer we discussed your blog and that day after our appointment I started to read it. As I sat in waiting rooms all day for my appointments I continued to read post after post to pass the time and couldn’t get enough. I signed up to get email alerts when new posts were written and pretty soon it became what I looked forward to each week. Between all the junk mail there would be the notification that a new post was up and that meant that I had a five minute break from the world.

This past fall I have been extremely busy with my job dealing with lots of traveling and deadlines and sometimes the stress tends to pile. No matter how overwhelmed I would be feeling when I started to read one of your blog posts all the things that seemed important disappeared for that short time.

I tend to worry a lot and am a bit of a control freak I’ll admit, but when I was diagnosed with cancer things that I thought were so important no longer compared to having it. That experience gave me a new way of living and seeing life with a new perspective. No one tells you though that if you are lucky enough to win the battle with cancer that eventually that new outlook you have on life tends to fade once things eventually start to go back to normal. There are times when certain things bring me back to that way of thinking when I did have cancer, whether its a movie, a book or examining my scar that I realize some things I worry about just don’t really matter as much as I think they do. Your posts are one of those ways I am brought back to that state of mind and remind me how fragile and short life is and how the things I was worrying about before are nothing compared to other issues in life and what I went through and could have gone through.

When I had cancer I didn’t share my feelings and thoughts that often with friends and family. I just felt no one knew what I was going through and I was trying to keep everything the way it was before. I also felt like I wasn’t worthy enough to talk about it since I had it much easier than lots of other cancer patients. I’ve noticed since then emotionally healing from having cancer has been a lot harder to deal with. Every post of yours I read helped me deal with those issues and heal in some way. Things I had thought about and didn’t know how to put into words were all there. The fact that you were able to cure me physically and even somewhat emotionally is beyond amazing to me. I have no way to tell you how thankful I am other than my words.

Although I know you don’t write as often now and I know you have good reason since you are a busy man I want you to know that not only are you a great doctor who saved my life, but you are a great writer who has helped me heal. “

Thank you my hero, for teaching me that all injuries heal including the deepest wounds. Your words have touched me deeply. That despite the injury that cancer inflicts on us, there are lessons that broaden our minds and deepen our senses to the ongoing conflicts we face in life. Thank you for opening my mind to the reactions and usually not shared. I truly am touched and indebted to your kindness and your words have far more impact that you can possibly imagine.

Mo.

 

Fog

I sat with my patient to discuss her progressive disease. It has now spread to many sites and it was deemed incurable. We had done several tests, and that much was certain at this point. I sat across from her and her mother. I started the conversation about treatment, but I felt I could not complete it. My patient got distressed and was no longer receptive to the information I was trying to relay. In addition to the tears in her eyes, the air between us felt foggy. I was not expecting her to “bounce back” and be with me in the session just yet. I wanted to say, “Go home come back in a week”, but I find that most patients want me to still speak after they’ve mentally left the session. They want me to go on a soliloquy penetrating the fog. I find that most want some instantaneous miracle to come out of my mouth. It saddens them further when I do not have that miracle. But I have to get through this conversation about the treatment, to get some sort of plan in place. All I want to say is go home and come another day.

 

Her mother took center stage with tears in her eyes and started asking questions to make sense of the decisions that needed to be made. Another set of ears to determine the next course of She pulled me in and pushed on the discussion in the midst of the fog that now clouds the mind of my patient. My patient was tearful, and her mind preoccupied and weary of what she is about to face. What do you say to someone who is young who has been robbed of the years yet to come?

 

A fog is blinding, the road that was clear is now murky. There are many dangers. I have never liked driving through a foggy day. I always say when it will end, having always to remind myself that it will eventually end. My eye sight limited, my vision obscured. My senses are heightened, ready to react, and my fears accentuated. I can only imagine the burden a diagnosis such as this places on the patient. When a fog descends upon your life, it’s not a highway, a road or an alley, but rather your life. I reflected on this, as drove in this morning through the thick fog that had engulfed Iowa City. The clouded roads, nowhere to hide from it, affecting everyone. I know that it eventually lifts but sometimes the feeling that it will not, overpowers. That is the time I wish I could tell my patient go home, and come out when the weather clears up.

 

I can’t lift the fog even if I try. The fog is in front of your eyes. The fog is in your way, the fog is in your life right now; but I know it will lift one day, and I hope that day is soon.

Agape

Love.

Selfless, sacrificial, deep and full. It has been a week filled with events that have made me see the human side of selfless; where others have gone out of their way to help. My week started on Monday when I found myself in a church in Rock Island. In honor of one of my patients, who took an initiative that amazed me, writing, editing, and publishing a book in less than a month about her fight with sarcoma. She did not stop there; she dedicated the book to sarcoma research and all the proceeds. I was honored to be amongst the people who supported her, and I was met with an enthusiasm that surpassed logic. When I stood at the podium to give a few words, I completely missed why I was there. She had poured her heart out to the world in words that she materialized into a book that she selflessly donated to sarcoma research. But that is not all that struck me.

She had been diagnosed with a rare tumor that does not grab media attention. Do you know what I mean about cancers that get attention, those that get chased by the paparazzi?  One person today in the clinic boldly said to me “Pink, it’s all about pink, what about the other cancers Mo?” I thought of yellow for sarcoma. She asked “who are their advocates?”  Well, that is a hard one. Over the years while I have been building my sarcoma program, I have watched as individuals stood up, each person a unique representation of a very diverse disease that is exceedingly rare. Today I share a story that is a stone on the journey that helped me reach a book signing that open my eyes to the community that really wants to help.

I share the story of a young woman who was faced with a fast growing sarcoma that made time and her sarcoma stand still. She had one motto in life that resonated with many; it was “live it”. She talked a patient into an amputation and he realized his dream by going to the Galapagos Islands where he shot darts with the pygmy people and played with seals on a beach. She told people to dream and never give up, to never quit asking and to find the best treatment that could give them a life. She told them that living was in the heart, and despite being afflicted with a rare cancer, she found her calling to help others. Truly selfless in her fight, she made me see beyond what one person could do to effect change in a community around her. I met her husband today and with his simple words, and amazing gesture, he said thank you.

Who are the advocates of the rare tumors? In my eyes, they are the special individuals who traverse reason, fight beyond any doubts spreading awareness and bringing camaraderie to a lonely fight because they were the pioneers that got there first and learned something. They battled ignorance, loneliness, hopelessness and mustered the courage to say: we shall prevail! I bow to them all tonight as I reflect on the courage and bravery of their hearts, in finding a voice that is loud enough to penetrate the people around them.

A bike ride, a motorcycle ride, a golfing event and a book………….

Thank you my friends. You have achieved the ultimate love.

Agape.

Mo

 

Ride It Out for Amber, June 2014
Ride It Out for Amber, June 2014
Courage Ride, August 2014
Courage Ride, August 2014
Drive Out Sarcoma, September 2013
Drive Out Sarcoma, September 2013
Mo and Laura Koppenhoefer, book signing, October 2014
Mo and Laura Koppenhoefer, book signing, October 2014
Fist bump at the book signing, October 2014
Fist bump at the book signing, October 2014

For information on Laura Koppenhoefer’s book, Notes on the Journey: Living with Sarcoma and Hope, visit the Living in Hope Foundation.

“Notes on the Journey: Living with Sarcoma and Hope”

Tonight Mo will be in Rock Island, Illinois signing books with sarcoma patient and new author, Laura Koppenhoefer. Mo wrote the forward for her book “Notes on the Journey: Living with Sarcoma and Hope” and all proceeds go towards his sarcoma research program. Below is a brief summary of the book from Laura herself.

“When I show up at the clinic for appointments and chemotherapy, the day starts with lab work.  Within the hour Dr. Mo will know what is going on “inside me” and make decisions about my care.  This all seems routine to me now.  Three years ago at my diagnosis of sarcoma nothing was routine.  I started writing on Carepages.com to help me sort out this journey with cancer, and communicate that journey with my congregation, family and friends.

Three years later, I am still living with sarcoma and know a lot more about myself than what shows up on lab tests.  I know about courage, hope, my faith, my need for community, the importance of top rate medical care at a sarcoma center, how to “read” what my body needs, and more.  I also know that we don’t know enough about sarcoma.

“Notes on the Journey: Living with Sarcoma & Hope” is a compilation of updates from my Carepages, with a foreword written by Dr. Mo.  All of the proceeds from the sale of this book are going to support sarcoma research at the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center.  To learn more about this effort, buy a book, link to my Carepage or other sarcoma resources, check out the Foundation’s page at www.LivingInHopeFoundation.org.”

You can also purchase Laura’s book on Amazon.com.

The book signing is from 6:30-8:30pm tonight at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 4501 7th Avenue in Rock Island. Mo will make a few remarks at 7pm.

Laura Koppenhoefer