Dialogue

Person: Can you help me?

Me: I believe that is why I am here, ready with a new treatment, a loaded gun and many tricks up my sleeve.

 P: Is it always this hard?

 M: Yes.

 P: Is there hope?

 M: Without it, we will not survive.

Imagine this dialogue that starts in the pit of someone’s stomach, a mixture of fear, anger, hope, and courage.  I partake in it and I do not dismiss it. Have you ever been afraid?  Where the walls caved in and it seemed confusing? Where what consumed others felt petty, trivial and meaningless. When you sit on the edge of a diagnosis of cancer and are worried about yourself, your family and your loved ones. This is the human I meet, sometimes confused, often afraid, and always hopeful. This is the person from which courage emanates. With this person, I stand united.

Cancer: I am here.

Me: Who are you? And why have you invaded us?

C: I am a product of survival, a state, a process. Who are you?

M: I am here to kill you.

These are my words when I look at cancer, the perfunctory introductions. A long battle is about to ensue. This is the enemy I know well. On this battlefield, a new sword has to be forged, to fight in the face of fear, uncertainty, and discouragement.  Every day a different person walks into my life and stands stronger against this common threat. Our unique existence, our individuality is a paintbrush that brings to life our depths and our dreams. In life, we march only forward regardless of how timid we feel or where our hearts want to be. I sharpen the reality that was thrust upon this person with my words. My patient stands steadfast in trust and belief.

And the dialogue resumes………

 Me: Which way this time? Cancer, are you ready?

 

To the moon!

We’re sharing a blog post written by the director of the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Dr. George Weiner. Tomorrow Dr. Weiner will be in Washington DC, as a guest of Vice President Joe Biden, to attend the Cancer Moonshot Summit. Back here in Iowa City, we will host a satellite summit that can be followed live through the HCCC Facebook page. This summit is just the start to what might be the best chance our nation has of ending cancer as we know it.

“Mo, what’s your cancer moonshot?”

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“My moonshot is for us to remove cancer from the human race and
put me out of business.”

 

About a year ago, I blogged about “going to the moon” as a metaphor for cancer research. More recently, the phrase “cancer moonshot” has taken on new meaning. In his state-of-the-union address, President Obama charged Vice President Biden with refocusing the nation’s effort on cancer and cancer research. To quote the President – “Vice President…

via Cancer moonshot – all systems “go” — Holden the Line on Cancer

The Line in the Sand

Very nicely put

36east36thstreet

I have heard about it before, but  now I understand it.  Before I was told that there is a line in the sand.  There is the time before and then the time after you know that a loved one has cancer.  One day you are kicking along and everything is fine and then the next day everything changes.

My mother.  Ever the pragmatist, stops at the funeral  home on the way back from the oncologist -since she was in the neighborhood.  We can rationally talk about this.  Everyone knows it will happen, but that does not change what happens when it does.   Does not change the sadness I feel.

I worry about my dad.  Fifty two years is a long time to be married and get use to someone.  And they seem happy.  How hard can it be for dad to deal with this?  Mom must be scared.

We have…

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