Patient Care, Perspectives, Sarcoma

Ambiguity

“You have to go home, you have a blog to write” my breathless patient uttered the words as he awkwardly ended our conversation last night. I was tired, but not nearly as much as he was. Yet he was there, caring about what I still had to do tonight. It had been a long day for him, a long week to be honest and now has been admitted. Patients get admitted for different reasons. Some to get chemotherapy, others with symptoms that are hard to manage at home.

It takes me one look at them to know that they need to be admitted to the hospital and that this is another battle they must face. Putting them in the hospital allows many aspects of their care to take place. They are right at the heart of the “factory”, with all the nurses, the physicians, the pharmacists, the medication, the machines and technology. He looked back at me and he knew that I would admit him. It was clear he was struggling and it was time to offer relief to him and his wife who cried but agreed this would be the best thing to do.

What will happen? Is it the cancer? They and I hoped for many other things and many outcomes, something I could possibly remedy. It’s not easy to see my patients struggling with their symptoms. They are trying hard to “fight”. They get stoic and a little stubborn. I promised to see him the next day to talk over the tests that I had asked the team taking care of him to do.  The ambiguity of not knowing his outcome was a thought that floated in my mind as I went home. I am ending my night praying for a result of a vision of him feeling better.

I walked away from the hospital, leaving my patient behind, but in the good careful hands of the staff in the hospital. I think of his words, “you have a blog to write” and I smile. Sure, I will work on my blog. He was one of my friends that read what I write every week.  It touched me that he read it, anticipated it and knew that I did that on Tuesday at the end of my day. I never know what I will write about, I just do. I let my day and mind settle. Tonight, like many nights, my thoughts are with those who are in the hospital. They linger with those that have ambiguity in what their outcome might be. It is a difficult place to be. Please know I am with you.

Goodnight my friends.

Mo

 

 

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