Patient Care, Perspectives

Interception

The little interactions with my patients are the highlights of my clinic. They help me in knowing them as people, understanding the pattern of disease globally and managing the side-effects that they could face. More importantly it is getting to know how they view their disease. Many of the therapies that we as oncologists give are as toxic and cause symptoms that can mimic the cancer coming back. It is hard to separate sometimes what is the cause of the complaint that people present with, is it the cancer, or the chemo? It takes time, a skill and patience. Providing the right atmosphere for the patient to talk is crucial for them to share freely their complaints. Providing a supportive and encouraging state, makes it raw and uncut but always honest.

Today one of my patients inferred that his disease was not responding to the chemotherapy that I was giving him. I listened, and let him narrate what he was feeling. He was feeling weak and had lost weight. I asked him some questions and he began to describe his symptoms. He described a high and low, like being on a roller coaster.  What appeared to me was a difference in the interpretation of his perception of what might be happening. I guided and steered him away from making assumptions, allowing him to tell me exactly what he was feeling. We juxtaposed his perceptions with what we both knew objectively and we worked together to a common ground where things were clearer.

I intercepted. I gave him my opinion that I felt what he was describing seemed more like the symptoms I would expect from his chemotherapy. I watched his face change expression. A relief came over him. “I trust you” he said “So you think I should keep going with the therapy?” Nothing had changed, it’s important to do the evaluation of the disease at the right time to make the correct deduction on whether the therapy was truly helping him. I stood by my recommendation, explaining carefully that it is hard sometimes to separate chemotherapy toxicity from cancer symptoms. His faith in the therapy seemed renewed and I said “it’s best not to cross the bridge before getting to it first”.

Mo

 

 

 

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